Tuesday, July 08, 2008

Classic Shows Now Viewable on CBS

In what may be yet another example of the sad state of TV these days, CBS has not only current shows available, but selected classics are available for viewing on its website as well. I cite this as a sad example because, frankly, I'd rather watch Star Trek, MacGyver, or Perry Mason than most shows on any network these days (plus CBS canceled the one show we regularly watched on their network, Moonlight. But more on that another time.)

Update: Also have The Twilight Zone.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice. Now that is news I can use. The original Twilight Zone is one of the best shows ever made and Star Trek - well I already have all 3 seasons, but I'm glad that they're there too. I've never actually seen MacGuyver, yes really. Now I can retroactively get all the subtle MacGuyver references that eluded me when I watched Stargate SG-1.

I agree, I can't think of much that CBS has had to offer of late. We liked Jericho enough to watch the first season and then a handful of the second season. And then there's - uhh. Well there is always - hmmm. You're right, classic tv is way superior.

I wish the BBC website would stream the new Dr. Who, but it isn't a perfect world.

Thanks for the information.

Tom

Gummby said...

You can stream episodes from the BBC website. If you're in the UK. :(

On the other hand, they'll let you stream all their radio channels, including the past 7 days as a replay, so its not all bad. One day I'm sure they will figure out a way to have subscriptions or some such service. In fact, if internet gets fast enough, that may be exactly what ends up happening with a lot of channels.

Netflix already has a $99 box that is a basically a web server for your TV. You can stream any of their instant watch content. It wouldn't surprise me if other technology like this pops up.

BTW, speaking of Netflix, they have Dr. Who Season 1 available for streaming. Oh, and the Little Rock Library has Season 2 in stock. Have you tried interlibrary loan?